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Veritas launches dedicated data centre in Australia

22 Mar 16

Veritas Technologies has launched a new, dedicated cloud data centre in Australia, and says the multi-million dollar investment addresses market demand for cloud solutions, in particular email archiving and e-discovery.

According to Veritas, organisations are increasingly looking to the cloud to increase business agility and streamline operational costs. However, rigorous Australian privacy and data integrity laws require companies to ensure customer data is strictly controlled or face potential fines and penalties.

To meet these needs, the new Veritas data centres support secure workload migration to the cloud for enterprise, public sector, and small and medium-sized organisations, the company says.

The first application hosted in the new data centre is Veritas Enterprise Vault.cloud, an archiving and eDiscovery solution that works with Microsoft Office 365 email and helps customers simplify compliance with data retention regulations. Enterprise Vault.cloud also works with on-premise email systems such as Exchange and Domino.

“Customers are asking for cloud solutions that allow them to leverage the flexibility of the cloud while maintaining their on-premise and private cloud investments. However, our Hybrid Cloud research shows that 24% of organisations are concerned with moving workloads to the cloud in order to keep confidential data in-country,” says Chris Lin, Veritas senior vice president and APJ sales leader.

“Email is a top workload moving to the cloud and this investment enables us to bring our data centres to our customers’ doorsteps to give them peace-of-mind that their data is retained within the country. We envisage strong demand for our Enterprise Vault.cloud solution as it simplifies customer infrastructure and lowers costs while providing data protection and advanced compliance including litigation-ready eDiscovery capability,” he says.

The new Veritas data centres will not be linked to data centres outside Australia, ensuring that data is stored solely in-country, Veritas says.

This strategic investment will also enable Veritas to meet the growing demand for its Enterprise Vault.cloud solution, which captures, stores and indexes business-critical information, including emails, attachments, Microsoft SharePoint, Box files, as well as content from unified communications and instant messaging systems, into a single, legally searchable, online repository, according to the company.

“With availability and insight into their valuable data, enterprises can be more productive and profitable. Veritas’ expansion of its local data centre footprint will go a long way in serving our Australian customers’ needs and preference to keep data close to where they operate,” says Louis Tague, Veritas sales director Australia.

The multi-year agreement will host primary data storage at Equinix in Sydney as the primary data centre and Melbourne as the backup data centre. This is Veritas’ third data centre infrastructure investment in Australia over the past three years.

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