Story image

Oracle's 2025 predictions for enterprise and an update so far

12 Dec 2017

At Oracle OpenWorld in 2016, Oracle CEO Mark Hurd made several predictions on how the enterprise would move to the cloud.

He predicted that

  • 80% of production apps will be in the cloud
  • 2 SaaS Suite providers will have 80% market share
  • the number of corporate-owned data centres will have decreased by 80%
  • 80% of IT budgets will be spent on cloud services
  • 80% of IT budgets will be spent on business innovation and only 20% on system maintenance
  • all enterprise data will be stored in the cloud
  • 100% of application development and testing will be conducted in the cloud
  • enterprise clouds will be the most secure place for IT processing

Some of his predictions were met with derision at the time, resulting in tweets that appear to have stayed with Hurd.

This year, at his OpenWorld keynote, he took the opportunity to prove his naysayers and detractors wrong, using data from various sources to back up his predictions.

“This wasn’t done with incredible rigour. They’re predictions. So you would think not many people would find this that challenging,” he said.

“But let’s introduce some of these mean tweets that we got because there were some people who thought that this was just wrong.”

Hurd highlighted some of the tweets he got in response to his predictions and proceeded to back up his predictions with data.

These included his predictions on the number of corporate-owned data centres decreasing, using statistics from IDC, his prediction for application development and testing being conducted in the cloud using numbers from Dimensional Research, and his prediction that the majority of enterprise data will be stored in the cloud, based on figures from Cisco.

“This was my prediction – that’s what I said.”

He reiterated the fact that the numbers were forecasts from external sources.

“You can take another run at me, but this is just data,” he said.

He concluded saying there were two things the audience should take away from the keynote.

“First, I wouldn’t tweet unless you’re really confident in your point of view about these predictions.

“Second, the inevitability of some of these points isn’t just because it’s a great idea, it’s bearing itself out in action and data,” Hurd said.

“I actually think these growth rates will accelerate as opposed to staying the same.”

He will be releasing a new set of predictions, he said, at another Oracle cloud event.

He hammered home the fact that cloud was the future of computing.

“This movement to the cloud that these predictions are based around, this is an inevitable destination as opposed to an interesting charismatic term.”

“This is how computing is going to evolve over the next several years,” he added.

Developing APAC countries most vulnerable to malware - Microsoft
“As cyberattacks continue to increase in frequency and sophistication, understanding prevalent cyberthreats and how to limit their impact has become an imperative.”
Dropbox invests in hosting data inside Australia
Global collaboration platform Dropbox has announced it will now host Australian customer files onshore to support its growing base in the country.
Opinion: Meeting the edge computing challenge
Scale Computing's Alan Conboy discusses the importance of edge computing and the imminent challenges that lie ahead.
Alibaba Cloud discusses past and unveils ‘strategic upgrade’
Alibaba Group's Jeff Zhang spoke about the company’s aim to develop into a more technologically inclusive platform.
Protecting data centres from fire – your options
Chubb's Pierre Thorne discusses the countless potential implications of a data centre outage, and how to avoid them.
Opinion: How SD-WAN changes the game for 5G networks
5G/SD-WAN mobile edge computing and network slicing will enable and drive innovative NFV services, according to Kelly Ahuja, CEO, Versa Networks
TYAN unveils new inference-optimised GPU platforms with NVIDIA T4 accelerators
“TYAN servers with NVIDIA T4 GPUs are designed to excel at all accelerated workloads, including machine learning, deep learning, and virtual desktops.”
AMD delivers data center grunt for Google's new game streaming platform
'By combining our gaming DNA and data center technology leadership with a long-standing commitment to open platforms, AMD provides unique technologies and expertise to enable world-class cloud gaming experiences."