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Hyperscale data centres surging globally, 132 more on the way

10 Jan 2019
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The relentless demand for more data has seen a spike both in the size and number of hyperscale data centres.

The Synergy Research Group has released research that paints an interesting picture. Not only did the number of large data centre operated by hyperscale providers rise 11 percent to reach 430 in 2018, but there is still more than 130 on the way.

Synergy’s research is focused on the data centre footprint of 20 of the world’s most prominent cloud and internet service firms, which incudes the largest operators in SaaS, IaaS, PaaS, search, social networking, e-commerce and gaming.

In terms of this growth in new data centre launches, Asia Pacific (APAC) and Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) featured most prominently. However, the United States still claims the biggest piece of the pie with 40 percent of the major cloud and internet data centre sites.

China, Japan, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Germany are the next most popular locations, in aggregate accounting for 30 percent of the total. Over the year new hyperscale data centres were launched in 17 different countries, with the United States and Hong Kong claiming the largest number of additions.

“Hyperscale growth goes on unabated, with company revenues growing by an average 24% per year and their capital expenditure growing by over 40 percent - much of which is going into building and equipping data centres,” says Synergy Research Group chief analyst and research director John Dinsdale.

“In addition to the 430 current hyperscale data centres we have visibility of a further 132 that are at various stages of planning or building. There is no end in sight to the data centre building boom.”

The lion’s share of the new data centre launches were attributed to Amazon and Google, with the two hyperscale operators claiming more than half of the total. Each of the 20 companies involved in the study have on average 22 separate data centre sites.

It’s the usual suspects at the top with the broadest data centre footprint, and they’re cloud providers – Amazon, Microsoft, Google and IBM. Each of these companies has more than 55 data centre locations with at least three in the four major regions, North America, Latin America, APAC, and EMEA.

Other companies of note with a significant data centre presence include Alibaba and Oracle. Synergy asserts the remaining firms tend to have their data centres focused primarily either in the United States (like Apple, Facebook, Twitter, eBay, and Yahoo) or in China (Baidu, Tencent).

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