Story image

Avaya's dirty little networking secret uncovered

15 Jul 2015

Avaya is one of those interesting vendors that has a very strong legacy that we all know them for.

Like Xerox means photocopies; Avaya for most of us in the industry means phone systems. Those massive solutions that run corporate telephony infrastructure. Avaya is exceptionally successful with government and enterprise organisations in New Zealand. A number of the key contact centres use their solutions.

In recent years this advanced telephony product range has been complemented by a strong move into unified communications and video conferencing.

One of the less understood parts of the business is its Network Solutions product range.

It obviously makes real sense for a phone system manufacturer to be in the networking business as almost all telephony services inside a business are run over IP and generally Ethernet these days.

However, the Network Solutions business doesn’t stop at just infrastructure for phones, it provides a full range of ethernet switches, wireless access points and video surveillance products.

The products have also been road tested in some serious situations. The most recent Olympics in Sochi ran almost entirely on phone and networking infrastructure from Avaya. This is more impressive given that this is probably the first Olympics held in this modern age of mass smartphone usage and the internet of things.

Even within the range of Ethernet switches they’ve got solutions for branch offices right up to core data centre top of rack type devices. They’ve got a tick in the SDN box and also have some proprietary technology around fabric networking.

Within the Wi-Fi range they have a joint venture with Zirrus which has developed clever wireless access points that don’t need controllers and are centrally managed from a cloud system.

Eighteen months ago Martin Claridge moved into the role of director for Network Solutions across Australia and New Zealand. In that time he’s overseen the network business double in size and brought on a raft of new partners.

Locally that includes strengthening their long-standing relationship with system integrator Agile, in mid 2014 bringing on Datacom Wellington and earlier this year Vodafone to spearhead the video surveillance push in New Zealand for them.

Claridge made it clear that he and his team are determined to continue to grow market share and win business in New Zealand.

The challenge will be whether his networking and video products can emerge from under the shadow of Avaya’s telephony focused reputation.

Dropbox invests in hosting data inside Australia
Global collaboration platform Dropbox has announced it will now host Australian customer files onshore to support its growing base in the country.
Opinion: Meeting the edge computing challenge
Scale Computing's Alan Conboy discusses the importance of edge computing and the imminent challenges that lie ahead.
Alibaba Cloud discusses past and unveils ‘strategic upgrade’
Alibaba Group's Jeff Zhang spoke about the company’s aim to develop into a more technologically inclusive platform.
Protecting data centres from fire – your options
Chubb's Pierre Thorne discusses the countless potential implications of a data centre outage, and how to avoid them.
Opinion: How SD-WAN changes the game for 5G networks
5G/SD-WAN mobile edge computing and network slicing will enable and drive innovative NFV services, according to Kelly Ahuja, CEO, Versa Networks
TYAN unveils new inference-optimised GPU platforms with NVIDIA T4 accelerators
“TYAN servers with NVIDIA T4 GPUs are designed to excel at all accelerated workloads, including machine learning, deep learning, and virtual desktops.”
AMD delivers data center grunt for Google's new game streaming platform
'By combining our gaming DNA and data center technology leadership with a long-standing commitment to open platforms, AMD provides unique technologies and expertise to enable world-class cloud gaming experiences."
Inspur announces AI edge computing server with NVIDIA GPUs
“The dynamic nature and rapid expansion of AI workloads require an adaptive and optimised set of hardware, software and services for developers to utilise as they build their own solutions."