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Microsoft pushes India towards climate change goals with new solar energy deal

07 Mar 2018

Hot on the heels of a solar energy deal signed between Microsoft and Singaporean company Sunseap last week, Microsoft has just completed its first ever solar energy deal in India.

The deal focuses on the Karnataka state of India and will see Microsoft purchase 3 megawatts of solar-powered electricity from Atria Power to help power its new office building in Bangalore.

Microsoft announced the deal would account for 80% of the projected electricity needs for the new facility.

The deal is part of a state government of Karnataka program to encourage investment in local solar energy operations, which is in line with the Indian Government’s goal to ramp up solar power generation to 100 gigawatts by 2022. This initiative is a key part of India’s efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change.

“Investing in local solar energy to help power our new Bangalore office building is good for Microsoft, good for India and good for the environment,” comments Microsoft India president Anant Maheshwari.

“We are proud to be deepening our long history of partnership and investment in India with this agreement.”

“This deal will help us grow sustainably and supports the growth of the Indian solar energy industry so that the entire country can more easily and reliably access clean electricity.”

Microsoft’s chief environmental strategist Rob Bernard says India has ambitious commitments to use more renewable energy.

“By purchasing local solar power to meet some of our local electricity needs, we’re not only meeting our goals but also supporting the growth of local clean energy industries,” Bernard adds.

“This growth leads to more clean electricity capacity, which will help India meet its targets for the Paris Agreement, reduce carbon emissions and provide clean electricity to its growing population.”

“We’re proud to play a small role in this Indian energy transformation.”

This deal is Microsoft’s first in India, and one of its first-ever deals of this kind in Asia.

Once completed, this project will bring Microsoft’s total global direct procurement in renewable energy projects to nearly 900 megawatts.

Additionally, the deals in Asia follow wind projects in Europe and a portfolio in the United States, and mark continued momentum toward the corporate clean energy commitments set by the company in 2016.

Microsoft’s goal is to rely on wind, solar and hydropower electricity for at least 50 percent of its energy usage worldwide by the end of 2018.

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