Story image

Rittal joins industry heavyweights to promote standardisation

11 Jul 17

​Rittal recently announced that it has joined the Open19 Foundation.

According to the largest rack producer in the world, more than three percent of the global electricity output is currently expended on data centres.

In addition to being one of the major users, it is also one of the fastest-growing consumers of power today.

Driven by the Microsoft subsidiary LinkedIn and global vendors, such as HPE and GE Digital, the Open19 Foundation was founded in May 2017 built on a key concept: standardised, modular IT infrastructures ensure higher efficiency, reduced costs, and greater flexibility in the data center.

According to Rittal, the open source design is based on a standardised architecture for computer and storage components in a customary 19-inch rack, in which the components from different manufacturers are compatible with each other.

Global director of Data Centre and Open Compute Solutions at Rittal, Jason Rylands says the decision to join the foundation was an easy one.

“Because of the rising energy costs, we use all possibilities for more energy efficiency in favour of our customers,” says Rylands.

“Underlining this, we have joined the Open19 Foundation in which we help shaping innovative rack design.”

Chairman of the Open19 Foundation, Yuval Bachar says they’re delighted to welcome Rittal to the group.

“The Open19 Foundation is a fast-growing community of companies across a wide range of data centre and edge ecosystems,” says Bachar.

“We are very pleased that Rittal, as a key actor and global player in the market, is now a member of the Open19 Foundation.”

Rittal says the company offers an inexpensive and quickly applicable solution in the form of an Open19 rack based on the standard 19-inch rack. The vendor will also support the Open19 ecosystem by promoting innovations both for existing data centres and for changing customer requirements.

“As a member of the Open19 Foundation, Rittal is now even better positioned to meet the needs of the data center market,” Rylands adds.

“These include the growing number of hyperscalers, colocation providers, as well as telecommunication convergence and edge computing.”

Rittal says one of the key advantages of the Open19 architecture is the standardised, modular configuration cuts the time to market while the scalability enhances the flexibility in the data centre.

Lenovo DCG moves Knight into A/NZ general manager role
Knight will now relocate to Sydney where he will be tasked with managing and growing the company’s data centre business across A/NZ.
The key to financial institutions’ path to digital dominance
By 2020, about 1.7 megabytes a second of new information will be created for every human being on the planet.
Is Supermicro innocent? 3rd party test finds no malicious hardware
One of the larger scandals within IT circles took place this year with Bloomberg firing shots at Supermicro - now Supermicro is firing back.
Record revenues from servers selling like hot cakes
The relentless demand for data has resulted in another robust quarter for the global server market with impressive growth.
Opinion: Critical data centre operations is just like F1
Schneider's David Gentry believes critical data centre operations share many parallels to a formula 1 race car team.
MulteFire announces industrial IoT network specification
The specification aims to deliver robust wireless network capabilities for Industrial IoT and enterprises.
Google Cloud, Palo Alto Networks extend partnership
Google Cloud and Palo Alto Networks have extended their partnership to include more security features and customer support for all major public clouds.
DigiCert conquers Google's distrust of Symantec certs
“This could have been an extremely disruptive event to online commerce," comments DigiCert CEO John Merrill.