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Japan: Salesforce gets bigger with opening of second data center

19 Apr 17

Salesforce has opened their second data center in Japan. The data center is in Kobe which is  in the country's Kansai region.

The company's first data center in Japan is located in Tokyo and opened its doors in 2011.

Salesforce is an American enterprise software and CRM provider with headquarters in San Francisco.

The addition of a second data center follows a successful year in Asia-Pacific for Salesforce. In Q4 of FY17, the Asia-Pacific region was the fastest-growing region for the company.

The second data center expands the company’s ability to deliver the Intelligent Customer Success Platform that includes Sales Cloud, Service Cloud, App Cloud, Community Cloud and Analytics Cloud.

"We are pleased to announce the opening of our second data center in Japan. With this new data center, along with the first local data center opened in 2011 in Tokyo, Salesforce will be able to continue delivering exceptional reliability and performance to customers," says Shinichi Koide, chairman, president and CEO, Salesforce Japan.

Koide says that the new data center will support the growth the company has seen in the Asia-Pacific area.

Koide comments, "the new data center will support the unprecedented growth we've seen in the region and further accelerate the adoption of the Intelligent Customer Success Platform. This is one of our commitments to Japan."

The company's client base includes a range of Japanese brands, such as Canon Marketing Japan, Inc., Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance Company and Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Insurance Inc., Ltd.

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