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Identity protection company Obsidian raises $20mil

01 Mar 2019

Identity protection company Obsidian Security has raised $20 million in a Series B financing round, bringing the company’s total funding to $30 million.

Investor Wing led the Series B with participation from GV and Series A investor Greylock Partners.

With the growth in adoption of cloud services, security teams are dealing with poor visibility of users and activities across SaaS and the cloud.

Administrators do not have visibility into what users do after logging on to these services.

Managing user privileges across disparate applications is siloed, burdensome and error-prone.

Account takeovers and compromised credentials are a rapidly growing vector of attacks worldwide, even in organisations that invest heavily in security services and products.

Obsidian's intelligent identity protection offering continuously analyses user activity, permissions and configuration data with machine learning to enable better security and identity management for enterprises.

The platform provides visibility, identity lifecycle management, and incident response and forensics to help organisations protect their users and critical SaaS and cloud assets.

In conjunction with the Series B, Gaurav Garg, founding partner at Wing, has joined the Obsidian board.

He joins Asheem Chandna and Sarah Guo, partners at Greylock, Obsidian CEO Glenn Chisholm and Obsidian CTO Ben Johnson.

“The battleground of enterprise security has shifted from network and endpoint protection to identity and access,” says Garg.

“Obsidian has built a much needed next-generation identity protection solution. They’ve embedded cutting-edge machine learning techniques to help organizations protect their users and critical applications.”

"Obsidian is focused on making identity a security advantage as enterprises move to hybrid architectures,” says Obsidian CEO and co-founder Glenn Chisholm.

Obsidian is a provider of identity protection for the hybrid enterprise.

Obsidian enables organisations to protect their users and critical SaaS and cloud assets with rich new visibility, smarter and less burdensome identity lifecycle management, and efficient incident response and forensics.

At the core of Obsidian’s machine learning powered offering is an identity graph.

The identity graph maps an organisation’s users to the assets for which they have permissions and is enriched with information about what users have done with their assets.

The company’s leadership team includes innovators from AWS, Carbon Black, Cylance, Dome9, the NSA and VMware.

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